How we saved over $700/month by switching from Carta to Google Drive

Carta is the Gold Standard for startups to keep their CAP Table, but at a price.

One of my companies hasn’t really raised any money, but we have a 50+ stakeholders do to a merger and employee options. We execute maybe 2-3 documents per year related to capital. So the $8,400 annual price of Carta cost us about $4,000 per transaction that we did. Obviously, that is absurd.

We ended up downloading all of the reports and PDFs of all existing options. And added some instructions for what we need to do when new options are granted, exercised, etc. We save the CAP table and related documents in a Google Drive (that we already pay for), and ended up saving $8,400+ per year!

I understand that there are a few other things, such as 409A valuations and peace of mind that come with having a professional software like Carta manage your CAP table, but the savings, for us, are an easy trade-off.

Silly Security: Don’t Show Me The Secret, Then Confirm I Have It!

I just received a replacement credit card from Health Equity because my previous card is expiring. Their validation screens made me laugh.

The first screen shows the card you are replacing, and includes the last four digits of the card.

 
Then the following screen asks for the last four digits of the card number “In order to verify possession”.

You probably shouldn’t tell me the last four digits before asking me to confirm that I have the card.

Make Sure You Are Calculating Net Promoter Score Correctly

The Net Promoter Score can be a pretty valuable metric for determining customer happiness, and, more importantly, how likely your customers are to tell other people about your product.

The basic idea is that you ask customers how likely they are to recommend your product to someone. Those who respond as a 9 or 10 are considered “Promoters”. When asked about your product, they’ll respond positively and encourage others to use your product as well. Customers who answer with a 7 or 8 are satisfied, but not likely to talk positively about your product. Customers who answer with a six or below are considered “detractors”. When asked about your product, they’ll respond negatively, detracting from your reputation. If you have a higher number of “promoters” than “detractors”, then your NPS Score will be positive. More detractors than promoters will result in a negative NPS score.

There is an excellent tool for calculating your Net Promoter Score at Delighted.com that helps to visualize this.

I was recently meeting with a leadership team and they mentioned that their Net Promoter Score was 6.6. That’s not a great score, but its not terrible. I don’t usually hear it expressed as a decimal, but I didn’t think much of it. After meeting with the team after several months, they kept mentioning NPS Score with a decimal and it had increased to 6.7. It was then that I began to ask questions into how they were calculating that. It turns out it was a simple average on a rating from 1 to 10. That is NOT an NPS Score! If anybody ever tells you their Net Promoter Score is between 1 and 10, make sure to dig in and make sure they are calculating it correctly! Scores should range from -100 (All detractors) to +100 (All promoters).

When calculated correctly, this product’s NPS score was actually negative. That helps to explain why revenue growth has been a challenge and marketing dollars are not moving the needle as they’d like.

Contrast that with another organization I meet with regularly. They calculate their NPS Score correctly and it’s a 60! No wonder this company has incredible growth and is doing well.

While your NPS score is negative, your first priority should be fixing the product and customer experience. Otherwise, every customer that signs up is likely going to detract from others using your product.

How to Think About Annual Contracts, Up-front Payments

I’ve helped several teams lately go through an analysis of when to consider annual prepayments for services. These are some of the decision criteria and metrics that I use to consider if an annual contract or pre-payment should be considered.

As a baseline, calculate the full amount that you would pay monthly. For most software products, this is the regularly advertised price. Make sure you are looking at the actual monthly plan proce though. A lot of services have started advertising as “$x per month billed annually“. Make sure to select the monthly payment price whe you see that. Some services, like commercial insurance charge a small per-payment fee for “installment plans” that should be included.

Next, calculate the full price if paid up-front. Of course, you need to include discounts that are offered. Sometimes, an offer may make it a period other than one year, such as “buy now and get 13 months for the price of 12”, which makes it a little more complex. In that case, you could consider the annual price as 12/13 of the amount you pay. Or, if the extra month is not really material, you may chose to ignore the extea month.

After you’ve got those two numbers (the annual and monthly prices), you should consider the other terms and internal needs.

Consider if your usage of the service is expected to change much over the next 12 months.

Also, consider how much flexibilty you lose with an annual pre-payment. Some services, like Slack give you a credit if usage decreases. Others have no flexibility and you pay that amount, even if usage decreases or you cancel.

In general, I expect around a 15% discount for a full up-front payment and very flexible terms for changes in usage or cancellation. If terms are more strict, I’d aim for more like a 30% (or more) discount for the commitment and up-front payment.

Finally, consider your own cash flow and capital positions. If you have an plenty of cash in the bank, you can lean toward the saving of an annual prepayment. If you don’t have a lot of cash, You’ll favor the monthly terms.

What are your thoughts and experience? What else should be considered when evaluation annual payments?

Using LastPass to Save Passwords and Log In to Multiple AWS Accounts With Two-Factor Authentication

I have multiple businesses, so I log into AWS multiple times per day.

That is a little tricky to do using LastPass since AWS has some hidden form fields that must be filled in
when using two-factor authentication through Google Authenticator.

In order to make it work correctly, I’ve had to modify the extra details in LastPass to add some extra hidden fields. If you set these up in your LastPass credentials for AWS, you should be able to log in with just a couple clicks, like usual, instead of having to type in some of those fields every time or having them overwritten.

Also, make sure to check the “Disable Autofill” checkbox an all of your AWS LastPass entries. Otherwise, one of them will overwrite the hidden form fields on the Two-Factor authentication page

Google Docs and Sheets should Almost Always be Restricted to Defined Users

Somebody sends you a link to a Google Sheet and it just works. It’s magical.
But that magic comes at a cost. I see far, far too many organizations that regularly share Google Documents and Sheets by using the share with “Anyone with the link” option that Google easily provides.

That is almost ALWAYS a bad idea. The convenience of having it shared with anybody is, at the same time, a potential security problem today and in the future.

But that long link with the 44 random-looking characters would be impossible for somebody to guess, right?

Yes. It would be statistically improbable for somebody to just guess a random string of 44 characters that would result in an actual document. It is possible that an attacker could write programs that could guess millions and millions of links to try them until they found some documents that actually exist. But that’s not the most likely weakness.

Consider what happens when you email a for your spreadsheet to somebody else. You have zero control over who accesses it after that. What if the recipient forwards your email with the link to somebody else? Often emails to businesses are forwarded into Customer Relationship Management (CRM) or similar systems where that link is now accessible to many other people in the organization. What if an attacker has access to a recipients email? Or a CRM system? How about if an employee leaves the company and they still have it in a browser history.

In all of those scenarios, and hundreds more that you can’t imagine, if your document is shared with “Anyone with the link”, literally anybody that sees that link can open it and you have absolutely no knowledge that they did.

Always share only with specific email addresses.

Sharing with Google Groups

Sharing with specific people can become a headache to maintain as people change roles. Consider using the Google Groups feature in your organization. You can set up a Google Group for something like ‘client-yourclientname@myorganziation.com’ or ‘team-myteamname@myorganization.com’ and ask to have documents shared with that group instead of individual people. You can then add and remove people from the groups to provide access to only those that are allowed.

See More information about sharing with Groups at https://support.google.com/a/users/answer/9308872?hl=en

Find MySQL indexes that can be removed to free up disk space and improve performance

I wrote this handy query to find indexes that can be deleted because they have not been in use. It
queries the performance_schema database for usage on the indexes, and joins on INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLES
to see the index size.

Indexes that have zero reads and writes are obvious candidates for removal. They take extra write overhead to keep them
updated, and you can improve performance on a busy server by removing them. You can also free up some disk space
without them. The size column below helps to understand where you have the most opportunity for saving on disk
usage.

mysql>
SELECT. OBJECT_NAME,
        index_name,
        SUM(INDEX_LENGTH) AS size,
        SUM(count_star) AS count_star,
        SUM(count_read) AS count_read,
        SUM(count_write) AS count_write
FROM  table_io_waits_summary_by_index_usage
JOIN information_schema.TABLES
    ON table_io_waits_summary_by_index_usage.OBJECT_SCHEMA = TABLES.TABLE_SCHEMA
   AND table_io_waits_summary_by_index_usage.OBJECT_NAME = TABLES.TABLE_NAME
WHERE OBJECT_SCHEMA LIKE 'mydatabase%'
GROUP BY object_name, index_name
ORDER BY count_star ASC, size DESC
LIMIT 20;

+------------------------------+---------------------------------+-------------+------------+------------+-------------+
| OBJECT_NAME                  | index_name                      | size        | count_star | count_read | count_write |
+------------------------------+---------------------------------+-------------+------------+------------+-------------+
| transactions                 | order_id                        | 42406641664 |          0 |          0 |           0 |
| transactions                 | msku-timestamp                  | 42406641664 |          0 |          0 |           0 |
| transactions                 | fkTransactionsBaseEvent         | 42406641664 |          0 |          0 |           0 |
| baseEvent                    | PRIMARY                         | 33601945600 |          0 |          0 |           0 |
| baseEvent                    | eventTypeId                     | 33601945600 |          0 |          0 |           0 |
| orders                       | modified                        | 20579876864 |          0 |          0 |           0 |
| orders                       | buyerId-timestamp               | 20579876864 |          0 |          0 |           0 |
| productReports               | productAd-date-venue            |  8135458816 |          0 |          0 |           0 |
| shipmentEvent                | id                              |  7831928832 |          0 |          0 |           0 |
| shipmentEvent                | eventTypeId                     |  7831928832 |          0 |          0 |           0 |
| historyEvents                | timestamp_venue_entity          |  4567531520 |          0 |          0 |           0 |
| targetReports                | venueId-date-targetId           |  3069771776 |          0 |          0 |           0 |
| productAds                   | venue-productAd                 |  1530888192 |          0 |          0 |           0 |
| keywords                     | venue-keyword                   |   895598592 |          0 |          0 |           0 |
| targetingExpressions         | venue-target                    |   215269376 |          0 |          0 |           0 |
| targetingExpressions         | rType-rValue                    |   215269376 |          0 |          0 |           0 |
| serviceFeeEvent              | PRIMARY                         |    48234496 |          0 |          0 |           0 |
| serviceFeeEvent              | id                              |    48234496 |          0 |          0 |           0 |
| serviceFeeEvent              | eventTypeId                     |    48234496 |          0 |          0 |           0 |
| adGroups                     | venue-adGroup                   |    42336256 |          0 |          0 |           0 |

MySQL Encryption In-Transit Does NOT Require Client-Side Certificates

There are many articles around the Internet that discuss enabling Encryption in-transit to MySQL servers. They all include instructions about creating Client Certificates, but they don’t clearly explain that Client-Side Certificates are not a requirement to achieve end-to-end encryption between client and server.

Creating Client certificates that can be authenticated by the server can be complicated. It is not even possible in some scenarios, such as using servers hosted by AWS RDS, since AWS runs its own Certificate Authority. But don’t let that stop you. Below, I will demonstrate that enabling SSL/TLS on the server, and using a client that supports encryption is sufficient to securely encrypt traffic between the two.

First, I set up a MySQL server on RDS using MySQL version 8.0.25. Nothing special here, except that I’m going to make it “Publicly Accessible” which gives is a Public IP Address so that I can access it over the Internet. My Security Group here already allows inbound port 3307 from my desired IP Addresses for testing:

aws rds create-db-instance \
    --db-instance-identifier=encryption-tester \
    --allocated-storage=20 \
    --db-instance-class=db.t3.micro \
    --engine=mysql \
    --master-username=admin \
    --master-user-password="thepasswordIchose" \
    --vpc-security-group-ids="sg-0bf6fa7080100e55b" \
    --backup-retention-period=0 \
    --port=3307 \
    --no-multi-az \
    --engine-version=8.0.25 \
    --publicly-accessible

It takes several minutes for my Database Instance to be created, then I can log into it with the command:

mysql -h encryption-tester.accountidstuff.us-east-1.rds.amazonaws.com -u admin --port=3307 -p

I run the command show status like 'ssl_cipher'; and look at that! My connection is encrypted already, as indicated by Cipher method present:

$ mysql -h encryption-tester.accountidstuff.us-east-1.rds.amazonaws.com -u admin --port=3307 -p
Enter password:
Welcome to the MySQL monitor.  Commands end with ; or \g.
Your MySQL connection id is 17
Server version: 8.0.25 Source distribution

Copyright (c) 2000, 2021, Oracle and/or its affiliates.

Oracle is a registered trademark of Oracle Corporation and/or its
affiliates. Other names may be trademarks of their respective
owners.

Type 'help;' or '\h' for help. Type '\c' to clear the current input statement.

mysql> show status like 'ssl_cipher';
+---------------+-----------------------------+
| Variable_name | Value                       |
+---------------+-----------------------------+
| Ssl_cipher    | ECDHE-RSA-AES128-GCM-SHA256 |
+---------------+-----------------------------+
1 row in set (0.01 sec)

I haven’t set up any client certificates or anything special, yet my connection is encrypted. But let’s not take the session variable’s word for it. Lets double-check by capturing and inspecting some packets.

I’ll run tcpdump with this command:

sudo tcpdump -i any host encryption-tester.accountidstuff.us-east-1.rds.amazonaws.com  -s 65535 -w /tmp/initial-connection.pcap

To make it quick, Instead of using a full packet-analysis program, I just run the strings command to look for text strings in the packet capture:

17:05 $ strings -8  /tmp/initial-connection.pcap
=JpgP~eS
mysql_native_password
Washington1
Seattle1"0
Amazon Web Services, Inc.1
Amazon RDS1%0#
Amazon RDS us-east-1 2019 CA0
210824170035Z
240822170850Z0
:encryption-tester.accountidstuff.us-east-1.rds.amazonaws.com1
Amazon.com1
Seattle1
Washington1
Seattle1
Washington1"0
Amazon Web Services, Inc.1
Amazon RDS1 0
Amazon RDS Root 2019 CA
:encryption-tester.accountidstuff.us-east-1.rds.amazonaws.com0
Seattle1
Washington1"0
Amazon Web Services, Inc.1
Amazon RDS1 0
Amazon RDS Root 2019 CA0
190919181653Z
240822170850Z0
Washington1
Seattle1"0
Amazon Web Services, Inc.1
Amazon RDS1%0#
Amazon RDS us-east-1 2019 CA0
HId0%aC>

Looks like a lot of stuff in that output about the certificate and SSL negotiation, but nothing containing the queries I executed.

I’m going to try it again and specifically disable encryption to see what the packets look like and ensure they contain the plain-text statements and responses I expect:

This is my SQL session:

17:05 $ mysql --ssl-mode=DISABLED -h encryption-tester.accountidstuff.us-east-1.rds.amazonaws.com -u admin --port=3307 -p
Enter password:
Welcome to the MySQL monitor.  Commands end with ; or \g.
Your MySQL connection id is 32
Server version: 8.0.25 Source distribution

Copyright (c) 2000, 2021, Oracle and/or its affiliates.

Oracle is a registered trademark of Oracle Corporation and/or its
affiliates. Other names may be trademarks of their respective
owners.

Type 'help;' or '\h' for help. Type '\c' to clear the current input statement.

mysql> select version();
+-----------+
| version() |
+-----------+
| 8.0.25    |
+-----------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)

mysql> show status like 'ssl_cipher';
+---------------+-------+
| Variable_name | Value |
+---------------+-------+
| Ssl_cipher    |       |
+---------------+-------+
1 row in set (0.01 sec)

mysql> \q

The strings in the packets captured during that session clearly contain things relevant to the commands that I executed:

17:05 $ strings -5 /tmp/skip-ssl.pcap
1%aCu
1%a\u
8.0.25
*Bi|tm
UkU-dsK
mysql_native_password
admin
mysql_native_password
Linux
_client_name
libmysql
24817
_client_version
5.7.35  _platform
x86_64
program_name
mysql
select @@version_comment limit 1
@@version_comment
Source distribution
select version()
        version()
8.0.25
show status like 'ssl_cipher'
performance_schema
session_status
session_status
Variable_name
Variable_name
performance_schema
session_status
session_status
Value
Value
Ssl_cipher

Conclusion:

SSL Client-Certificates are NOT required for traffic to be encrypted to a MySQL server. In fact, with a modern client and server, SSL is preferred and is automatically enabled. Just like I’d expect for traffic to be encrypted by default in 2021.

So what is the purpose of Client Certificates during a MySQL Connection

Client Certificates are intended to verify the identity of the Client. They are an extra step of authentication beyond a typical username and password. By presenting a client certificate that has been properly signed by a recognized Certificate Authority, the client is proving that their identity or system has been verified by the Certificate Authority.

Because SSL is complicated and is not well understood, many well-meaning people have instructions for creating a client key and client certificate, and transmitting those to authorized users. While that does provide a second piece of information needed to authenticate to the server, it is not how a secure client should authenticate.

The proper, fully secure method for a client to get a certificate is for the client to create its own private key. It should never share that key, even with the Certificate Authority. With the private key created, it would then create a certificate signing request (CSR), and present only the certificate signing request to the Certificate Authority. The certificate authority takes whatever steps it requires to verify the authenticity of the client, then provide the client back with a Client Certificate signed by the Certificate Authority. That Client Certificate is the client’s evidence that it’s identity has been verified by the Certificate Authority. The Certificate Authority is able to provide the client certificate without ever having the client’s private key.

Best Practices

If you run a MySQL Server and want to require that all clients to connect via SSL/TLS, you can set the global setting require_secure_transport to true. To require SSL only for specific users, use the CREATE USER ... REQUIRE SSL statement when creating the MySQL user

Installing Composer Packages with custom SSH Identities

Several posts around the Internet describe how to use a specific SSH Identity composer packages, but I can never find them when needed.

This is how I use a specific SSH identity file for packages deployed with GitHub via Deploy keys. GitHub allows a deploy key to be used with only a single repository, so if you have multiple repositories, you need a separate SSH key for each.

Create the SSH Key

ssh-keygen -t ed25519 -f ~/.ssh/repo-foobar -N '' -C "foobar-deploy"

Copy the contents of ~/.ssh/repo-foobar.pub into the “Deploy Key” section of the Repository settings in GitHub.

Now, you can script a deploy, including a composer install that includes that repository with the command

Use a custom GIT_SSH_COMMAND during composer install

cd /path/to/codebase
export GIT_SSH_COMMAND="ssh -i /home/username/.ssh/repo-foobar -o 'IdentitiesOnly yes '"
COMPOSER_HOME="/home/username/" composer install

The composer_install command uses the defined SSH command (instead of just plain ssh). In doing so, it uses the identity only from the specified key.

Have multiple repos included in your composer.json file that each need a separate identity?

You’ll need to create the SSH key and upload a separate key to GitHub for each repo. However, you can only specify one SSH key to use during the composer install. While there are more elegant solutions, I’ve found the simplest is just to run composer install multiple times, one for each package, and change the identity file between each one. The first execution will fail, but will keep the downloaded code in the composer cache. The second one won’t need to re-download the first again since it is already in the cache, and if you with as many packages as you have, it will eventually succeed, having downloaded each of them.

LastPass Challenges with Multiple Organizations

As a parallel entrepreneur, I’m a participating member of multiple companies. That brings with it some unique challenges, as many software tools don’t gracefully handle a user belonging to multiple organizations. I’ve learned to deal with that in many situations. Typically I’ll often having to log out and back in as the desired user or have multiple browsers or browser profiles open – one for each organization.

One area that has been particularly challenging has been group password management. There are not a lot of software options, although there are getting to be some new players. LastPass is the most mature option, and is the product that I have used for a long time. I investigated some alternatives including 1Password and DashLane. Both of those looked a little more modern and polished, but neither seemed to have mature support for multiple organizations.

Lastpass does claim to have robust support for organizations, but there is minimal, if any, mention on their website or elsewhere that mentions belonging to multiple organizations. It has taken me a lot of experimenting, but I’ve finally come up with a solution that works well.

You might think, as the diagram above indicates, that each organization to which you belong should invite your personal account to become a member of the organization. You would be wrong. Although this seems like the intuitive relationship, it does not work since LastPass only allows a personal account to attach to exactly one LastPass Enterprise account. Not more.

The correct way to belong to multiple Enterprise Accounts in LastPass is to choose one of the organizations to be your “Main” account to which you log in on a daily basis. You connect your Personal account to this enterprise account so that your personal sites appear alongside your work passwords.

Then, to add additional organizations, you don’t purchase a user license in those other organizations. Instead you create one or more shared folders, and share the folders with the email address for your “Main” organization account. There is a limitation that you can’t be an admin of the shared folders in these other organizations since you are not part of the Enterprise, but sharing and day-to-day password usage works generally as expected.

This method seems less intuitive, but works well now that I’ve figured it out. As I’ve learned more about how LastPass works internally, I understand why this unorthodox configuration is required

A few other quirks I’ve found, which just take some getting used-to:

  • Shared folders from my personal account DO NOT SHOW UP when logged into my enterprise account. You have to share to your main organization email address instead.
  • Folder structure in my Personal Account is not confusing in the User-Interface when browsing passwords in my enterprise account. The folder-within-folder structure doesn’t render well, and it is confusing as to which “level” I’m at.

I hope that the folks at LastPass are able to simplify this or make it more obvious how it is to be configured.

Do you have a better solution for password sharing with multiple organizations? Please let me and others know in the comments.