Fixing a Corrupt MySQL Relay Log

Posted on September 30th, 2008 in General,Linux System Administration,MySQL by Brandon

As an extension of my post yesterday about skipping corrupt queries in the relay log, I found out that my problem is due to some network problems between the servers which triggers a MySQL bug.

The connection and replication errors in my MySQL log looks like this:

080930 12:26:52 [ERROR] Error reading packet from server: Lost connection to MySQL server
  during query ( server_errno=2013)
080930 12:26:52 [Note] Slave I/O thread: Failed reading log event, reconnecting to retry,
  log 'mysql-bin.000249' position 747239037
080930 12:26:53 [Note] Slave: connected to master 'replicate@mysqltunnel:13306',replication
  resumed in log 'mysql-bin.000249' at position 747239037
080930 13:18:49 [ERROR] Error reading packet from server: Lost connection to MySQL server during
   query ( server_errno=2013)
080930 13:18:49 [Note] Slave I/O thread: Failed reading log event, reconnecting to retry, log
  'mysql-bin.000249' position 783782486
080930 13:18:49 [ERROR] Slave: Error 'You have an error in your SQL syntax; check the manual
  that corresponds to your MySQL server version for the right syntax to use near '!' at line 6'
  on query. Default database: 'database'. Query: 'INSERT INTO `sometable`
            SET   somecol         = 3,
                    comeothercol  = 8,
                    othervalue      = NULL!', Error_code: 1064
080930 13:18:49 [ERROR] Error running query, slave SQL thread aborted. Fix the problem, and
  restart the slave SQL thread with "SLAVE START". We stopped at log 'mysql-bin.000249'
  position 783781942
080930 13:18:50 [Note] Slave: connected to master 'replicate@mysqltunnel:13306',
  replication resumed in log 'mysql-bin.000249' at position 783782486

When there are network problems between the server, there was some issue where the master didn’t properly detect and notify the slave of the failure. This resulted in parts of queries missing, duplicated, or replaced by random bits in the relay log on the slave. When the slave tries to execute the corrupt query, it will likely generate an error that begins with:

Error You have an error in your SQL syntax; check the manual that corresponds to
  your MySQL server version for the right syntax to use near . .

This bug has been fixed in MySQL releases since February 2008, but still hasn’t made its way into the CentOS 5 repositories. Until then, that bug report contained a work-around which forces the slave to re-request the binary log from the master. Run ‘SHOW SLAVE STATUS’ and make note of the Master_Log_File and Exec_Master_Log_Pos columns. Then run ‘STOP SLAVE’ to suspend replication, and run this SQL:

CHANGE MASTER TO master_log_file='<Value from Relay_Master_Log_File>',
  master_log_pos=<Value from Exec_master_log_pos>;

After that, simply run ‘START SLAVE’ to have replication pick up from there again. That evidently has the slave re-request the rest of the master’s binary log, which it should (hopefully) get without becoming corrupt, and replication will continue as normal.

I guess the network connection between my servers is problematic lately. I’ve had to fix this several times in the past couple days. If that keeps up, I may add this fix to my Replication checking-script until I’m able to upgrade to a version of MySQL that contains this fix.

Fix MySQL Replication by Skipping The Problematic Query

Posted on September 29th, 2008 in General by Brandon

MySQL replication can be a bit fragile.  Most of the time replication fails when the slave tries to run an SQL statement that causes an error.   I’ve most frequently seen this when the slave is missing some table that I forgot to import when setting replication up.   Usually it is a simple enough job to create the table, then start the slave SQL thread again.

However, sometimes replication breaks for no particular reason at all. This morning, I had a slave stop because an invalid query somehow got written to the binary log.  I’m not quite sure how that happened, but fortunately I found a way to just skip the bad query.

mysql> stop slave;
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.00 sec)

mysql> SET GLOBAL SQL_SLAVE_SKIP_COUNTER = 1;
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.00 sec)

mysql> start slave;
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.00 sec)

The ‘SQL_SLAVE_SKIP_COUNTER setting tells the slave SQL thread to skip that many queries when starting up. Note that you should really know what your database is doing and why it stopped before you just go running this command. It may cause your slave to get seriously out-of-sync with the master server.

Busy Lately With Personal Stuff

Posted on September 16th, 2008 in General by Brandon

Posts on this blog have been a little slow lately because I have been pretty busy with stuff in life.   For any family or friends, you can head on over to my family blog to read about what has been going on.